Is gushing allowed? Can I gush about how awesome js_of_ocaml is?

I searched “js_of_ocaml” and “awesome” and didn’t find many gushy results, so I thought I’d fix that.

js_of_ocaml is awesome. Thank you for developing this! I can’t believe it’s now possible to deliver OCaml applications to O(billions) of people in a very low-friction way: through their browser!

I’ve been aware of this project for a few years now, so this may come as too late to the party, but I finally had the time to take a crack at it. It’s good stuff. The performance is great, even on my ten year old laptop.

I’m now actively going back through projects and rewriting every .js file I have access to as an .ml file because I’m so excited. The thought of writing new webapps in the future is much less daunting because I don’t have to settle for doing it in some super lame error-prone language. This is so life-affirming!

THANK YOU FOR JS_OF_OCAML

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This is actually really exciting to hear, for someone who hasn’t tried doing anything OCaml-to-JS yet.

As another data point from someone afraid of Javascript, I’ve been using ocaml-vdom and jsoo successfully for a small internal application. It works out of the box (except for some very ugly continuation passing style code that had to go, but that’s JS’ fault anyway).

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With the rise of WebAssembly JS can be thrown out of the window[s], and let OCaml do all the job alone. The only missing thing at this point is the DOM interaction with WebAssembly. But AFAIK it’s in their roadmap.

See other discussions here:

Until then, and particularly while some of us still have to support older browsers, js_of_ocaml is a great solution.

With BuckleScript/ReasonML also bringing JS developers into the OCaml fold, it’s a good time to be an OCaml fan